[REVIEW] “Mockingjay” By: Suzanne Collins

Official Synopsis:

“My name is Katniss Everdeen. Why am I not dead? I should be dead.”

Katniss Everdeen, girl on fire, has survived, even though her home has been destroyed. There are rebels. There are new leaders. A revolution is unfolding.

District 13 has come out of the shadows and is plotting to overthrow the Capitol. Though she’s long been a part of the revolution, Katniss hasn’t known it. Now it seems that everyone has had a hand in the carefully laid plans but her.

The success of the rebellion hinges on Katniss’s willingness to be a pawn, to accept responsibility for countless lives, and to change the course of the future of Panem. To do this, she must put aside her feelings of anger and distrust. She must become the rebels’ Mockingjay – no matter what the cost.

Rating: 5/5 Stars

Review:

*NOTE: This review contains spoilers!

Mockingjay kicks off pretty much immediately after the events of Catching Fire. One thing that I think the book does very well is show both Katniss and Finnick’s PTSD. They’re both dealing with the PTSD of their first games, the Quarter Quell, and the current situation all at the same time; not to mention, Finnick has had an extra decade as a victor and mentor to add on to his trauma.

Just like Cinna, Katniss eventually sees Boggs as a sort of father-like figure, which is why I think Collins made the decision to have him die. If Katniss has an adult that she trusts that can take control and help her and tell her what to do, she’d rely on them too much. (I wouldn’t say that Haymitch completely fills that role.)

Even though this was definitely not my first time reading the book, Peeta being easily liberated and then being hijacked was a twist that I think added to the story really well.

What is the point of Katniss and her crew continuing on to the Capitol, when the rebels basically meet up with them anyway? Why did so many of them have to die? I know it wouldn’t of made an interesting plot otherwise, but I’m still salty (aka heartbroken) that Finnick died. I understand that it was like the 76th Hunger Games, and they were in a war; I wonder if Katniss would’ve been in danger from Coin had she returned to District 13?

Two points of the book practically made me cry — one, when Katniss is outside and has a breakdown about the roses and Peeta, and she reaches out to Haymitch for comfort; and again when Finnick dies.

Even though she only makes a brief appearance, it is interesting to read about Tigris after reading The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes — there is obviously a lot that had to happen to her between the two books for her to get where she is when we meet her in Mockingjay.

When Katniss, Haymitch, Enobaria, and Johanna vote yes to there being one final Hunger Games with Capitol (high up political figures’s children), that just sort of disappears. I don’t think it ever ends up happening, but I would think it should be something to be addressed. I’ve seen some speculation that when Coin dies, the idea dies with her, but I don’t think it’s specifically addressed.

Overall, (with the exception of a few deaths…) I think that this is a satisfying conclusion to the trilogy. The epilogue lets us see a glimpse into Katniss and Peeta’s future, as they slowly try to rebuild their lives in this new world.

***

“The Hunger Games” – REVIEW

“Catching Fire” – REVIEW

“Mockingjay” – REVIEW

One thought on “[REVIEW] “Mockingjay” By: Suzanne Collins

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